Food Poisoning Litigation: Seeking Compensation for Illness and Injury

Food poisoning is one of those problems that afflict many people at least once in their lives. Sometimes, symptoms are mild and may be difficult to trace back to something you ate. Other times, symptoms are acute and severe. But is food poisoning really serious enough to warrant litigation?

In some cases, the answer is a definitive "yes." In certain populations — such as children, the elderly and those with compromised immune systems — food poisoning can be fatal. And although food poisoning can certainly be an accident, it is often a sign of a larger problem along the food supply chain. Just think of the many salmonella and E. coli lawsuits in the news that begin with a single reported case and grow to include dozens of victims.

Where and How Does Food Contamination Happen?

We now live in an age where our food supply is national, if not global. The vegetables we eat here in Pennsylvania may have been grown on the West Coast. The oranges we eat may have come from Florida or even South America.

Certainly, farmers and growers may face liability for food contamination. Problems can also occur when food is shipped to and stored in warehouses and grocery stores. And if the food is purchased for use in a restaurant or cafeteria, unsafe handling practices in these commercial locations could be a source of contamination.

Although food is shipped quickly and to many different locations, it can be traced back to its source by those who know how to investigate cases of food-borne illness. If you've been sickened and are at risk of severe health problems as a result, you should report your concerns to the proper authorities and contact a food poisoning attorney like Douglas V. Stoehr.

Toxins and Bacteria Causing Food Poisoning

Here are some of the more common diseases linked to contaminated food:

  • Bacillary dysentery/Shigella (including Shigella from infected swimming pools)
  • Salmonella (the second most common food-borne bacteria causing illness and almost 30 percent of all food poisoning deaths)
  • Campylobacter (affecting chicken and turkey particularly, but also other meat products and unpasteurized milk products)
  • E. coli
  • Hepatitis A
  • Listeria
  • Norovirus
  • Botulism

Contact Us Today to Discuss Your Legal Options

With an office in Altoona, Douglas V. Stoehr, Attorney at Law, serves clients throughout west central Pennsylvania. To speak with an experienced personal injury lawyer about your case and your legal options, call us at 814-946-4100. You can also reach us via email.